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US denies Imran Khan’s ‘foreign conspiracy’ allegations, says Pakistani PM’s claim untrue

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The United States has denied allegations of “foreign conspiracy” by Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan. The US State Department has said that there is no truth in Imran Khan’s allegations. In fact, Prime Minister Imran Khan, in the face of a political crisis, named the United States for the threatening letter in his speech, which he claimed was “evidence” of a conspiracy to overthrow his government.

“The United States has sent us a letter,” Imran Khan said in a public address on Thursday. Imran Khan then admitted his mistake, saying that a foreign country, not America, had sent a message that was against the Pakistani nation.

A spokesman for the US State Department told ANI that there was no truth in the allegations. We are closely monitoring the development of Pakistan. We respect and support Pakistan’s constitutional process and the rule of law. ”

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On Wednesday, the government led by Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party confirmed that its allegations about a “foreign conspiracy” were based on a diplomatic message received from one of its embassies abroad. At a huge rally in Islamabad on Sunday, Khan pulled a piece of paper out of his pocket and shook it in front of a crowd, claiming it was evidence of an “international conspiracy” to overthrow his government.

Khan said in his speech that the letter was not against the government but against him. “If the no-confidence motion is passed, Pakistan will be pardoned, if not, there will be consequences,” Khan said. Khan said it was an “official letter” sent to the Pakistani ambassador, who was writing a note during the meeting.

The prime minister said the ambassador was told that Pakistan would face “problems” if Imran Khan remained in power. Khan said, “I am telling my nation today that we are in this situation. We are a country of 22 crore people and another country … they are not giving any reason (to make threats). He said that despite consultations with the Foreign Office and the military leadership, Imran Khan himself had decided to go to Russia.

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