U.S. News

The victim’s son was heard 16 times in support of the parole of the murderer who spent 53 years in jail

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Highlights

  • US Senator Robert F Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan seeks parole
  • After hearing 16 times, the board recommended a prisoner who has been in jail for 53 years
  • Kennedy’s sons support Sirhan’s release during virtual hearing

Washington
The board on Friday recommended the parole of Sirhan Sirhan, the man who assassinated US Senator Robert F. Kennedy in 1968. The fate of the 77-year-old prisoner, who has spent 53 years in prison, is now in the hands of the Governor of California. Kennedy’s sons Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Douglas Kennedy supported his release during Sirhan’s 16 appearances before the parole board.

Jailed since 1969
At the same time, many other children of Kennedy have strongly opposed this move. Sirhan was brought to the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation in May 1969 after being convicted of assault with intent to murder and ‘first-degree’ manslaughter. Douglas was a child during his father’s assassination in 1968 when his father was shot and killed. During the virtual hearing, Douglas said that he was overwhelmed to see Sirhan in front of him.

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Son said- I love you
He said, ‘I think I have lived my life somewhere in fear of Sirhan and his name. Today I am very happy to see him as a person who seeks love and kindness.’ Wearing a blue uniform, Sarhan, who attended the hearing, smiled as he listened to Douglas. Douglas said, ‘I love you.’ Hearing this, Sirhan shook his head and bowed down.

Crying sirhan apologizes
Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who has previously supported Sirhan’s release in the past, supported the parole. He said that when he met Sirhan for the first time, he was shaken- ‘he cried and started apologizing by holding my hands.’ The two-person panel has recommended parole but the final decision is yet to come. Despite the release recommendation, Governor Gavin Newsom could overturn the board’s decision. He will determine whether the granting of parole is in the interest of public safety and this process may take a few months.

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